vanguard1219:

uvsiren:

Discworld

Discworld Death is best Death.

(via katimus)

jenniferrpovey:

alexofeddis:

thescienceoffandom:

Here are some basics on herd immunity, and here is some more technical research if you’re interested in the details! 

If you’ve ever heard my rants about vaccination, you know it’s a major topic with me. Because hey, I’m one of these immunosuppressed people this comic talks about, so it’s a bit of a sensitive subject. (“Oh, I’m sorry, you don’t like getting vaccinated? I don’t like having three month long respiratory infections because you gave me the freaking flu, but I guess you don’t care about that”)

Essentially, Ellen and her wonderful character Katherine have just said it better than I ever could—and using Shaun of the Dead references, too!!! It’s all about herd immunity—getting vaccinated isn’t just about your own health, it’s about the health—and non-zombification—of the entire human race.

Awesome explanation.

(via nethilia)

If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

(via isanah)

It’s difficult being comfortable with yourself. It’s even more difficult when you’re disabled. It means knowing your limits intimately. It means running into a brick wall for your efforts and licking your wounds in the wake of your failure.

For me, it means learning what acceptance truly means. I’ve pinpointed my struggles; I’ve explored ways around them. But the more I embrace both my talents and my limitations, the more people latch onto only one or the other. Some have an image of who I should be — this smart, talented, enthusiastic girl — and when I tell them I can’t always be that girl, they call it a waste. They call me a waste.

Others wax rhapsodic about how I prove autism is no excuse for laziness or failure. I’m an inspiration, they say; I overcame my disability. Me? I just gape. After all my years of difficulty, the last thing I want is for people to use my experiences to put down others who struggle. What’s so inspirational about accepting your limitations? When did I overcome anything?

I never overcame. I incorporated.

Autism helped me become an internationally published author–heres how by Corinne Duyvis (Otherbound) at the Guardian

(via corinneduyvis)

(via weneeddiversebooks)

starsofsagittarius:

irreducibilitas:

Grimm and Other Folk Tales

by Cory Godbey

(via abellandapomegranate)

In fairy tales, monsters exist to be a manifestation of something that we need to understand, not only a problem we need to overcome, but also they need to represent, much like angels represent the beautiful, pure, eternal side of the human spirit, monsters need to represent a more tangible, more mortal side of being human: aging, decay, darkness and so forth. And I believe that monsters originally, when we were cavemen and you know, sitting around a fire, we needed to explain the birth of the sun and the death of the moon and the phases of the moon and rain and thunder. And we invented creatures that made sense of the world: a serpent that ate the sun, a creature that ate the moon, a man in the moon living there, things like that. And as we became more and more sophisticated and created sort of a social structure, the real enigmas started not to be outside. The rain and the thunder were logical now. But the real enigmas became social. All those impulses that we were repressing: cannibalism, murder, these things needed an explanation. The sex drive, the need to hunt, the need to kill, these things then became personified in monsters. Werewolves, vampires, ogres, this and that. I feel that monsters are here in our world to help us understand it. They are an essential part of a fable. — Guillermo Del Toro (via semisweet-rubix)

(via abellandapomegranate)

opticallyaroused:

Shattered Mirror Sunset Reflections That Look Like Stained Glass Windows

(via abellandapomegranate)

didyoumissme-221b:

feline-ranger:

causenotsymptom:

malformalady:

Glass headstones

Imagine a graveyard full of these on a sunny day. It would be so beautiful.

I would position mine so that every day when the sun was in the right position it would set fire to the roof of someone I hated, thus achieving revenge from beyond the grave every single day.

There are two kinds of people

didyoumissme-221b:

feline-ranger:

causenotsymptom:

malformalady:

Glass headstones

Imagine a graveyard full of these on a sunny day. It would be so beautiful.

I would position mine so that every day when the sun was in the right position it would set fire to the roof of someone I hated, thus achieving revenge from beyond the grave every single day.

There are two kinds of people

(via abellandapomegranate)